Todd Finn - RE/MAX Partners



Posted by Todd Finn on 1/14/2018

Moving is a big adjustment for any of us, yet it can be hardest on the children in our lives. Moving can mean a new school for your kids and a whole lot of unfamiliar faces. There are a few ways that you can help kids adjust to the change of moving to a new place and help them to feel at home faster. 


Let Them Be Involved With The New House


As a child, it can seem like moving into a new house is all about adults. Kids may feel that they’re merely along for the ride. You can let the kids pick out some things in the house. What color should their room be? Can the kids give some input on a new piece of furniture? Make moving a family affair and allow everyone in the family to feel included to make the transition smoother. 


Get Enrolled In Local Activities


See what types of local activities are available for the kids (and you) to be enrolled in. From tennis lessons to summer camp to after school activities, there’s plenty of things in a community that you and your family can get involved in. If you can find an activity to participate in with your kids, it will only make it easier for them to feel comfortable meeting other kids. You can also get acquainted with other adults to get some more information and insight about your new community. Making new friends and doing something they love will help your kids to feel right at home. The kids will feel more comfortable i their new school as well if they get involved.  



Help Kids Stay In Touch With Old Friends


Moving isn’t all about making new friends. Kids can still keep in touch with their old friends. If you didn’t move very far away, schedule dates for your kids to meet up with their old friends. If you have moved across states, encourage your kids to keep in touch with old friends through phone calls and video chat meetings. They’ll know that someday, they’ll see each other in person again. These actions can help in the transition of moving as well, since kids will see that their old lives have not been completely lost and forgotten about.


Stroll Around The Neighborhood As A Family


One great way to get adjusted to a new neighborhood is to explore it by foot. Make it a point to take an evening stroll as a family. The kids can learn a bit more about the area and begin to feel more comfortable in their surroundings with your help. You’ll also make discoveries about your new surroundings as a family.




Tags: Buying a home   kids   moving tips  
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Posted by Todd Finn on 1/7/2018

Flood insurance represents a valuable investment for many homeowners across the country, and for good reason. This type of insurance guarantees that your residence and personal belongings are protected against flooding due to a severe rain storm or other inclement weather. Therefore, purchasing flood insurance may enable you to avoid substantial losses due to flood damage associated with a natural disaster.

So how does flood insurance work exactly? Here are three things that every homeowner needs to know about flood insurance.

1. Flood insurance and homeowners insurance are very different.

Flood insurance serves as a supplemental insurance that can be purchased in addition to your homeowners coverage. However, flood insurance does not substitute for home insurance, and vice-versa.

Typically, a homeowners policy does not offer flood coverage. This means if your house is filled with water due to a natural disaster, your homeowners coverage will not protect you against property damage or losses.

In many cases, a bank or credit may require a homeowner to purchase flood insurance if he or she owns a house that is located in a floodplain. Conversely, you may want to consider purchasing flood insurance even if live outside a floodplain.

Remember, even 1 inch of water after a flood can cause major damage in your home. But if you have flood insurance in place, your home and belongings will be protected against flooding at all times.

2. Flood insurance is provided via the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

The NFIP offers flood insurance policies for your home and possessions. A flood insurance policy for your home guarantees that you're protected against any flood damage to your residence. Meanwhile, contents coverage insures you against loss of possessions due to flooding.

Also, it is important to note that flood insurance policies usually require at least 30 days before they go into effect. This means that you likely won't be able to purchase flood insurance only days before a major hurricane is expected to arrive in your city or town.

3. Flood insurance won't necessarily cover your entire home.

Federal flood insurance commonly offers coverage worth up to $250,000 for your home and $100,000 for your belongings. Therefore, if you own a home that is worth $300,000 and it is destroyed in a flood, your flood insurance policy will not cover the entire cost to replace your residence.

Comparatively, you can purchase "excess flood insurance" through a private insurance company to supplement a federal flood insurance policy. Excess flood insurance offers a great option if you want to insure your home and possessions against floods and guarantee that any policy claims are covered beyond national limits.

4. Floodplains may change over time.

Floodplain maps frequently change and evolve over time. Thus, a residence that was not in a floodplain several years ago may now be located in a floodplain.

If you plan to sell your residence, your real estate agent can help you find out if it is located in a floodplain. Or, if you intend to buy a new home, your real estate agent can tell you whether a residence is located in a floodplain as well.




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Posted by Todd Finn on 12/31/2017

Do you know the history of your home? How you respond to this question may dictate whether you're equipped to maximize the value of your residence. As a home seller, you'll want to know when your home was built and other facts about the condition of your residence before you add it to the real estate market. And with the right amount of research, you should be able to find out plenty about your residence and share this information with prospective homebuyers. Some of the key home history questions that every home seller should consider include: 1. How Old Is Your Home's Roof? An old roof could become a costly repair that no homeowner wants to encounter. However, home sellers who understand when their roof has been repaired or replaced can share this information with homebuyers and empower these buyers with additional details to help them make an informed decision. Remember, an old roof won't necessarily deter homebuyers from checking out your house. At the same time, you'll want to account for your roof's condition when you price your residence. Also, you may consider completing roof renovations before you list your home on the real estate market, as these repairs may help differentiate your residence from similar homes that are available. 2. When Was Your Hot Water Heater and/or Furnace Replaced? A homebuyer surely wants a home that is easy to heat. And if you've replaced your home's hot water heater or furnace recently, you likely will be better equipped to optimize the value of your residence. If you're uncertain about the age of your home's hot water heater or furnace, you'll want to have these items tested by professionals to ensure their quality. Typically, an average hot water heater will last between eight and 12 years; comparatively, an oil furnace usually will last up to 10 years, while a gas furnace may perform well for up to 20 years. And if it's been some time since these products have been repaired or replaced, you may want to consider installing new ones before you add your home to the real estate market. 3. What Is the Age of Your Air Conditioning System? While the hot water heater and furnace are likely to generate concerns from homebuyers, the condition of your home's air conditioning system probably will do the same. Like many appliances, your home's A/C system will start to break down over an extended period of time. This commonly happens after 10 to 15 years, but home sellers who have maintained and repaired their A/C system regularly may be able to reduce the need to replace this unit. Focus on finding out as much information as possible about your home and sharing this information with homebuyers. By doing so, you are able to be fully transparent about what your residence offers homebuyers. Thus, you may be able to speed up the process of selling your home. Dedicate the time and resources needed to learn about the history of your home, and ultimately, you'll be better equipped to find homebuyers who are interested in your residence.





Posted by Todd Finn on 12/24/2017

After you accept a homebuyer's offer on your residence, he or she likely will complete a home inspection. Then, the homebuyer may choose to move forward with the home purchase, rescind or modify his or her offer or ask the home seller to complete home improvements.

Ultimately, a home seller is likely to have many questions following a home inspection, including:

1. What did the homebuyer discover during the home inspection?

As a home seller, it is important to do everything possible to enhance your residence before you add it to the real estate market. By doing so, you can boost your chances of generating substantial interest in your house. Plus, when a homebuyer performs a home inspection, he or she is unlikely to find any problems that may slow down the home selling process.

An informed home seller may conduct a home appraisal prior to listing his or her house on the real estate market. This appraisal enables a home seller to identify potential trouble areas within a residence and explore ways to address such problems.

If you failed to perform a home appraisal, there is no need to worry. For home sellers, it is important to see a home inspection as a learning opportunity. And if a homebuyer identifies problems with your residence during a home inspection, you should try to work with him or her to resolve these issues.

2. Should I stand my ground after a home inspection?

Be realistic after a home inspection, and you'll be able to make the best decision about how to proceed.

For example, a home seller who goes above and beyond the call of duty may address major home problems prior to listing his or her house on the real estate market. This home seller will dedicate the necessary time and resources to correct home problems and ensure a homebuyer is able to purchase a top-notch residence.

But what happens if a homebuyer identifies problems during a home inspection, despite the fact that a home seller already tried to correct various home issues?

A home seller should consider the homebuyer's inspection report findings closely. If minor home repairs are needed, he or she may be able to fix these problems to move forward with a home sale. Or, if a homebuyer is making exorbitant demands, a home seller may feel comfortable allowing the homebuyer to walk away from a home sale.

3. How should I proceed after a home inspection?

A home inspection can be stressful for both a home seller and a homebuyer. After the home inspection is completed, both parties will be better equipped than ever before to make informed decisions.

If a homebuyer encounters many problems with a residence, he or she will let the home seller know about these issues. Then, a home seller can complete assorted home repairs, offer a discounted price on a home or refuse to perform the requested home maintenance.

Working with a real estate agent is ideal for a home seller, particularly when it comes to home inspections. A real estate agent will negotiate with a homebuyer on your behalf and ensure you streamline the home selling process.





Posted by Todd Finn on 12/17/2017

Although property buyers fall in love with a home for different reasons, there are four factors that generally cause people to prefer one house over another.

For sellers, the cost of making their home more appealing to buyers can vary widely. It depends on how recently they've painted, updated, and made improvements to their property -- both inside and out.

When it comes to owning and maintaining a residential property, one thing's for sure: Deterioration is going to happen! It's also human nature to postpone taking care of needed updates, minor repairs, and issues like fading paint. Even though the condition of your home may feel comfortable to you, prospective buyers will see things through a different lens. If you think you're "too close to the trees to see the forest," your real estate agent can provide you with valuable tips and an objective point of view.

While there are a lot of qualities house hunters look for when they're sizing up a house, here are a few key factors that can make the difference between a quick sale and a home that lingers on the market for months or more.

  • Brightness: Inadequate light -- both natural and artificial -- can have a negative impact on the impression your home makes on potential buyers. If you're fortunate enough to have newer windows that let in lots of natural light, then the look and feel of your home will be much more appealing. Heavy drapes can detract from that effect, as can overgrown bushes and trees. Lighting fixtures that are noticeably outdated or glaringly bright will also work against you. Since one of your objectives as a seller is to make your home as appealing and cheerful as possible, proper lighting is a feature that's well worth keeping in mind.
  • Cleanliness: A factor that comes in "a close second" to brightness is cleanliness (Some might even put it in the number-one spot). Visible signs of dust, dirt, spills, or smudges can make an otherwise attractive home unappealing to prospective buyers. Undesirable odors can also turn off most, if not all people that come over to check out your house. A solution for some sellers is to have their house cleaner stop by more often to help them stay one step ahead of dirt, grime, and household messes.
  • Freshness: There are a lot of ways to create a feeling of freshness in your home, including opening windows (weather permitting), adding a coat of neutral-colored paint to scuffed walls, and displaying fresh flowers in a couple rooms -- especially the kitchen. Baking soda can also help eliminate unpleasant odors in your refrigerator, sink, and garbage disposal.
While all homes for sale have different needs, in terms of staging, decorating, cleaning, upgrading, and repairing, a seasoned real estate agent can point out strategies, ideas, and improvements that will help you put your best foot forward!